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260 - FROM LITERARY TEXT TO FILM: AN INTRODUCTION *

core

Course description: The course aims to introduce students to the relationship between literature and cinema within the Italian context. Besides analyzing key structural, thematic, and stylistic aspects of the cinematic adaptation of literary texts, we will tackle pivotal issues of the historical, political, social, and cultural evolution of Italy, focusing on the period between the fight for national independence (mid- to late-1800s) and the post-war reconstruction. We will examine and discuss seminal works of Italian literature (by authors such as Boccaccio, Boito, Pirandello, Moravia, Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Calvino) and their cinematic counterparts (by directors such as Pasolini, Visconti, De Sica, and the Taviani brothers). No knowledge of Italian is required.

Credit not given for both this course and 01:560:347,348, 349, 350.

Instructor’s goals: The course aims to provide students with a broad knowledge of key historical, social, and cultural issues through the analysis of significant works of narrative fiction and their cinematic adaptations. Through in-depth readings of literary and filmic texts, class discussions, and written assignments, the course is designed to foster the development of essential analytical and critical skills that students can apply to diverse historical periods and cultural frameworks.

Departmental Goal II: Cultural Proficiency

This course satisfies the Core Curriculum Learning Goals: AH (oand p).

Course Materials:

A Reader will be made available by the instructor and posted on SAKAI.

Course Requirements:

The abilities defined in the learning goals will be assessed through oral and written activities.

Active class participation (15%); Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions.

One oral presentation (20%); Students are required to give a 15-minute presentation on a topic discussed with the instructor. Their performance will be evaluated according to their effectiveness in communicating as well as the thoroughness of their critical analysis of the subject.

Three 3-page papers (35%); Students are required to analyze a literary or visual text, discussing at least two sources linked to their topic. They expected to demonstrate the ability to address and communicate complex ideas in standard written English.

Final exam (30%); The exam comprises three essay questions on the topics discussed in class and tackled in the written assignments. It assesses each student’s progress in the ability to engage critically with the issues tackled in the course in relation to their historical, social, and cultural background as well as with the theoretical concepts expounded in the course.

Attendance, Participation, and Disabilities Policies.

Due to the nature of the course, consistent class participation is mandatory. If a student misses more than three classes without medical documentation, her/his grade will be automatically reduced by one fraction (for instance, an A will become a B+); missing more than five classes will imply a further decrease of a grade fraction; the same rule will apply for each additional class the student will not attend

Please note: no late assignments and make-up exams.

In case students with disabilities should require any special type of assistance and would like to request accommodations, they must follow the procedures outlined at:

http://disabilityservices.rutgers.edu/request.html

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism (the representation of the words or ideas of others as one’s own), every quotation must be indentified by quotation marks or appropriate indentation and must be properly cited in the text or in a footnote, Always acknowledge your sources clearly and completely when you paraphrase or summarize material from another source (in print, electronic, or other medium) on whole or in part. If you are in doubt, please consult the policy on plagiarism and academic integrity at Rutgers and do not hesitate to ask for clarifications, if needed.

http://academicintegrity.rutgers.edu/integrity.shtml

Due to the nature of the course, consistent class participation is mandatory. If a student misses more than three classes without medical documentation, her/his grade will be automatically reduced by one fraction (for instance, an A will become a B+); missing more than five classes will imply a further decrease of a grade fraction; the same rule will apply for each additional class the student will not attend.

Contact Us

Department of Italian
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
15 Seminary Place, #5105
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


Voice (848) 932-7031
Fax (732) 932-1686

Sheri La Macchia, Administrator

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